May Special

 

May Massage Special

 

 

Get 3 Massages For The Price of 2

Most people would agree a massage makes them feel good. But many probably don’t realize exactly how good a regular massage is for their overall health. How about if they knew massage could improve performance, aid recovery, prevent and eliminate injuries, reduce stress and even enhance metabolism and circulation!

Getting a massage can do you a world of good. And getting a massage frequently can do even more. Taking part in this form of regularly scheduled self-care can play a huge part in how healthy you’ll be and how youthful you’ll remain with each passing year. Budgeting time and money for massages at consistent intervals is truly an investment in your health.

Remember, just because massage feels like a pampering treat doesn’t mean it is any less therapeutic. Consider massage appointments a necessary piece of your health and wellness plan, and work with your therapist to establish a treatment schedule that best meets your needs.

 

Massage Promotion:

Click here for full details on the on this amazing Massage Special

 

Benefits of Regular Massages ▼

The Benefits

  • Increase the blood’s oxygen capacity by 10-15%
  • Help loosen contracted, shortened muscles and stimulate weak, flaccid muscles. This muscle “balancing” can even help posture and promote more efficient movement;
  • Speed recovery from exercise-induced fatigue;
  • Increase production of gastric juices, saliva and urine;
  • Increase excretion of nitrogen, inorganic phosphorus, and sodium chloride (salt). This suggests that the metabolic rate increases;
  • Balance the nervous system by soothing or stimulating it, depending on which effect is needed;
  • Improves function of the oil and sweat glands that lubricate, clean and cool the skin. Though, inflexible skin can become softer and more supple;
  • Indirectly or directly stimulating nerves the supply internal organs can dilate the organs’ blood vessels, improving blood supply.

 

How Massage can Help with Pain or an Injury ▼

Massage and Pain or Injury

Massage helps recovery from soft tissue injuries. Tissue growth and repair is accelerated by efficient circulation and appropriate stimulation. Massage also plays a part in every form of sport or exercise. Unfortunately, many people believe aches and pains are an inevitable consequence to activity. But massage can actually reduce or eliminate what may appear to be exercise-induced pain.

 

It can increase endurance, control fatigue and help people feel better when used as part of a regular health program. Massage can also speed muscle recovery rates as it eliminates irritation from waste. By helping reduce fatigue and aid recovery, massage enables more productive training, with longer, more effective workouts. The ultimate spin-offs are better performance with fewer injuries.

 

What Injuries can Massage Treat?

  • Headaches & migraines
  • Frozen shoulder
  • Sore shoulder and neck
  • Back pain & sciatica
  • Tennis and golfers elbow
  • Sprains, strains and tears
  • Over-use injuries
  • Shin splints

 

Massages Will Help Reduce Stress ▼

Massage = Stress-Reduction

Everybody experiences some form of stress through work, family, the environment and society. Mental tensions, frustrations, and insecurity cause the most damage. Hormones released by stress actually shrink the vessels, inhibiting circulation. A stressed mind and body means the heart works harder. Breathing becomes rapid and shallow and digestion slows. Nearly every body-process is negatively affected.

 

Studies show stress can cause migraines, hypertension (high blood pressure), depression, some peptic ulcers, etc. In fact, researchers have estimated 80% of disease is stress related. Soothing and relaxing massage therapy can counteract the effects of stress.

 

 

 

We strongly advise that you call to make your appointments if you wish to take advantage of this offer. To make an appointment call, 703-549-1990. This offer can not be purchased as a gift certificate.

 

 

 

Share and Enjoy:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • Add to favorites
  • PDF
  • Print
  • email